Ziva’s Arabic Dance Corner: Ziva Goes Global! A Dancer’s Guide to traveling Abroad

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December 2012 Hipstastic Newsletter

Ziva Goes Global!

A Dancer’s Guide to Traveling Abroad

November 23, 2012

Konichiwa Hipline!  I’m writing from the depths of Japan as I tour with Lebanese Master Percussionist Souhail Kaspar.  We are currently halfway though a full itinerary of teaching and performing in 5 Japanese cities.  While I know that the remaining 12 days of our tour will bring plenty of experiences and adventure, I’d like to share what I’ve learned so far as a traveling dance artist.

1.  Nice Luggage is Worth the Investment!

I’m only halfway through our trip and I’ve taken six planes, four trains, and plenty of taxis.  Durable, lightweight, east-to-transport, luggage is a must have!  Don’t over pack your suitcase as you’ll want to be able to transfer it easily and may want to bring home a few souvenirs.

2.  The Language of Human Movement.

When you travel to countries with a language barrier, knowing native words like “hello”, “thank you” and, in my case, “vegetarian” are vital.  Beyond words, facial expressions and hand gestures will communicate a lot.

I realize that when I teach dance workshops in Japan, my playful words like “juicy” and “big mamma hips” may be lost in translation.  Instead of worrying about students understanding the literal meaning of my diction, I dance out my words and use an expressive tone of voice.

One of my most comforting and magical experiences traveling in Japan has been witnessing the universal language of dance.  The same shimmy that is recognized in Berkeley is recognized in Tokyo and Cairo and possibly worldwide.  The fact that I have the opportunity as an American dancer to share my love for Middle Eastern dance with an Asian country shows the widespread passion and strength lying behind Raqs al Sharqui.  Music and movement can truly unite cultures.

3.  Be Prepared for Anything

The art of improvisation is a must have tool in dance and in life.  Any teacher knows that his or her lesson plan may need to be instantly altered to adapt to the level of the current student.  For this tour, I prepared 5 choreographies and a variety of theory exercises knowing that each city would have it’s own requests and needs.

I believe that a dance artist should consistently work on all elements of her craft.   She should practice and study her art even when there may be no specific upcoming project.  This will only help with easing into an on-the-spot situation and nailing a surprise opportunity.

4.  Rest Up Buttercup!

Sleep when you can! It’s a great idea to rest up even before your trip.   A dancer depends on her physical and mental energy so it’s important that she gets adequate down time.  Often a busy tour schedule will permit limited windows for resting.  Take advantage of them.  You’re email or whatever is keeping you up late at night will be there in the morning.  Get those Zzzz’s when you can!  Also, taking multi-vitamins and eating nutritious meals along the way will keep you healthy and strong.

5. Give it Your All

This may go without saying, but it’s good to remember that one opportunity often leads to another.  You never know who will be watching.

I was invited by Souhail Kaspar to do this tour because 4 years ago I gave it my all as a workshop student in one of his Rhythm and Movement classes.  Since that workshop, I’ve taken every opportunity possible to learn from Souhail’s mastery as a teacher, entertainer, world traveler, and percussionist.  I’m so grateful for each moment that I’ve been presented with to grow.  Treat each opportunity as a gift; you never know when you’ll be presented with another one.

Ziva looks forward to dancing it up at Hipline again on December 8th.  Until then, “Arigato Gozaimas!”

Ziva Emtiyaz

Hipline Arabic Dance Program Director

ziva@myhipline.com

www.zivadancer.com